Sarin Custom Series- renowned N.A. timeless legacy

Sarin Custom Series, development of the first yacht line to bear the distinguished naval architect’s name is under way. From his studio located on a peaceful island in the Pacific Northwest, Jack Sarin is busily working on a custom yacht series that will bear his name. For decades he has quietly but steadily put his imprimatur on pleasure yachts worldwide, more than 400 at last count. The Sarin Custom Series will focus on full- and semi-displacement luxury yachts in a variety of classes and mediums: MCA, Ice Class and long-range.




2011 Aquabay 70′ Express

Standard Specifications: Length Overall (LOA): 69′ 9″ Beam: 17′ 5″ Engines: Twin Caterpillar C-18, 1000Hp Draft: 3′ 4″ Fuel Capacity: 1122 US GAL Water Capacity: 265 US GAL Displacement: 97,000 lbs. Cruising Speed: 23 knots Max Speed: 27 knots Designer: Peter Lowe Layout: 3 staterooms / 3 heads Key Benefits: Open main deck layout SCRIMP (resin infusion) construction makes it extremely stiff and light Sex appeal- you can’t deny good looks, premium engineering and exact execution Push button retractable salon sunroof! 100% ABYC compliant & built to DNV high speed boat classification (ABS, Lloyds, NK, RINA available upon request) Transom toy storage w/remote controlled access hatch Summary: There’s much to like about this yacht from the famed TC Yachts shipyard, based in Taipei, Taiwan.  With the performance package it can exceed a top end speed of 40kts (I know because I personally tested it!).  You can be the wolf by day and the refined gentleman by night. Entertain the family or just you and that special someone. Check out the video below and then contact us for a VERY SPECIAL price on the current hull- only 6 months to delivery!!...




More Boats sold in 2010

What we all speculated for more than 4 months is finally confirmed by Yachtworld’s proprietary reporting. US yacht brokerage sales for the first quarter of 2010 closed nearly 30 percent higher than in the same period in 2009. Roughly 6000 boats were sold this quarter, and valuation grew from $167M to $326M. The boost is mainly due to increase of megayachts sales in March. Here is the complete article published in April by John Burnham on the boats(dot)com blog: Reports from yacht brokers at our sister website, YachtWorld(dot)com, are that the volume of U.S. brokerage boat sales has grown substantially in the first three months of 2010. So if your boat is on the market, or you were thinking of putting a For Sale sign on it soon, your chances of selling it at a reasonable price are probably better than they were six months ago. The chart to the right tracks recent and historical YachtWorld(dot)com broker sales of powerboats in the United States, and the red line representing 2010 sales clearly indicates that sales are up significantly from 2009 (blue) and also matching or bettering 2008 sales (green). The full-year chart that follows shows the trend back towards “normal” in another way, against a five-year average of sales. It’s true that brokerage boat sales aren’t as high as in 2006 or 2007, but they are certainly showing recovery from the worst of the recession. I should point out that these figures are based on unaudited reports of sales made by Yachtworld.com member yacht brokerages in the proprietary database, SoldBoats.com, so they don’t cover every brokerage sale made in the United States, but they do show a positive trend in sales. According to the broker reports, close to 6000 boats were sold, compared to approximately 4600 in the same time period in 2009, and the total valuation of brokerage boat sales also rebounded dramatically for the January-March period, from $433 million in 2009 to $736 million in 2010. New-boat sales have yet to make the same comeback, according to reports I’ve read. A recent story in Boating Industry, a trade publication, cites research pointing to a 21-percent drop in sales for boat dealers during the first two months of the 2010 compared to the same months in 2009. For their sakes, I hope that will turn around this spring. There has already been some positive news from boat builders rehiring workers who were laid off a year ago, other trade reports such as this one on Brunswick stock going up in Soundings Trade Only, and news from boat shows like last weekend’s Strictly Sail Pacific, which many exhibitors judged to be their best in several years. With many people in the United States still out of work, including lots of folks who build boats, the economic picture is far from rosy, but it’s definitely improving. And as I said at the outset, if you have a boat to sell, your chances of selling it are getting better. Then again, if you’re thinking of buying one, the prices are climbing, too. For more articles visit The Boats(dot)com...




Choose the right loan

Philip Bartholomew from Seacoast Marine Finance dives right into boat financing, and help you navigate through the plethora of options. While the pool of conventional marine lenders has narrowed since 2007, there are still banks that continue to offer boat loans and yacht loans. Some are large, national or multi-national banks, others are small-to-mid-sized local or regional players. Many use third party finance brokers to sell and set up their loans to borrowers meeting the bank’s criteria. Other banks, as well as some investment brokerages, cater only to their existing customers, either securing the loan with the boat or permitting them to leverage other assets (land, securities, investment account balances to name a few) in order to borrow money for a boat. I happen to think it makes much better sense to secure the loan with the boat rather than encumbering other assets, but that’s another post. Here, I’ll focus on the general types of marine loans, $75,000 and up, which are offered by banks, secured by the vessel, and available to the qualifying consumer. Loan conditions, interest rates and costs vary by loan size and lender, so you will ultimately be better-served by speaking to a specialist with a broad knowledge of what is available in the marketplace. As discussed in my last post Who qualifies for a yacht loan in this economy?, 70-80% of a vessel’s purchase price may be financed for up to 20 years and, in rare cases, higher. Above $5,000,000 or so, terms range from 7 to 15 years. Generally speaking, you’ll find four types of loans: fixed rate, variable rate, hybrid, and interest-only. Fixed rate loans: The interest rate remains fixed throughout the term. The amortized principal payment plus the interest remains the same and the payment will not fluctuate for the life of the loan. This type is more appropriate for the consumer anticipating longer-term boat ownership (4 to 5 plus years) and willing to accept a moderately higher interest rate in return for the comfort that their payments will not increase should rates go up. Variable rate loans: the Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM): the interest rate is based upon certain floating indexes and will change with the rise/fall of the index. A bank margin is added to the indexed rate to calculate the effective rate of the loan. A current example is a Prime rate loan at 3.25%, plus a 250 basis point (2.50%) margin, which equals an effective rate of 5.75%. The margin typically does not fluctuate, but the index can. For instance, should the Prime rise to 4.00%, the effective rate becomes 6.50%. Indexes commonly used in yacht financing are the LIBOR and the Prime rate. Current index rates can be viewed on websites like BankRate(dot)com Variable rate loans are often taken by borrowers with shorter-term ownership plans and those willing to realize significantly lower interest rates in return for incurring additional risk that their payments could fluctuate. Hybrid loans: A fixed rate loan and an ARM: a fixed interest rate for a certain period, usually three to five years, then converting after that period to a variable interest rate plus margin for the remainder of the term. Because of the shorter fixed term, the initial interest rate is often a quarter-to-a-half per cent lower than longer term fixed rate loans. Hybrids are popular with buyers having a specific length-of-ownership in mind and/or those looking to enjoy the lower...




Bahamas: A classic sleeps 8

Bahamas Charter: $15,000 discounts for May, June & July charters! Contact us for Fall rates Specs Equipment: Length: 40.25 Meters 132.1 Feet Beam: 8.06 Meters 26.4 Feet Draft: 2.36 Meters 7.7 Feet Number of crew: 7 Engines: Twin 1960/hp Diesels MTU 12V396TB Cruising speed: 12 Fuel Consumption: 50 US Gall/Hr Accommodation: Number of cabins: 4 Cabin configuration: 3 Double, 1 Twin Bed configuration: 2 King, 1 Queen, 2 Single, 1 Convertible Number of guests: 8 Water Sports: Tenders + toys: 18′ Novurania w/ 115hp 4-stroke outboard 2 Yamaha 800cc SeaDoo’s Windsurfer (beginners board) 2 Kayaks (2 person) Wakeboard Slalom ski / Water skis (adult and child) / Knee board / Inflatable donut / Inflatable banana Snorkel gear Various beach toys Fishing gear (limited) Compressor & Dive gear 2 mountain bikes Monte Carlo is a showpiece of classic elegance and international style. Her refit in 2006 with whole new interior refit is eagerly awaited. Two master staterooms of equal appointment are offered onboard – perhaps one of Monte Carlo’s most distinguishing features, one suite is located on the main deck and one below. Each of these luxurious staterooms features a king-size bed, entertainment system, vanity and ensuite bath outfitted with shower and bidet. Wonderfully spacious, the yacht has a total of four staterooms, all of which afford a warm and inviting ambiance. Please keep in mind that each boat has a different way of calculating charter rates. We strongly suggest you call us and get the facts straight, in some cases a special discount may be available. Call 954.650.7353 or email barin@lucidyacht.com today for...